Fun facts on Mandarin Oriental Hyde park, London’s multi-million pound restoration

Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park, London has completed the most extensive restoration in its 115-year history, designed to confirm this historic hotel’s position as one of the best in the world.   The following fun facts highlight some of the details that guests and visitors alike will find within the hotel:

  • Upon arrival, guests are greeted with a centrepiece glass chandelier in the shape of a closed flower bud, which is further complemented by an open flower blossom chandelier suspended over the lounge area that brings a theatrical dose of nature indoors.

  • The suite ceilings are painted in a light gloss finish with a geometric pattern that matches the horse-riding bridal paths through Hyde Park.

  • The suite chandeliers were inspired by fallen acorns and seed pods. Each acorn is encased in a design that makes reference to the crown jewels used during royal ceremonies hosted in the hotel to create an “illuminated jewellery” effect that can be seen from the park.

  • Hand-painted and foiled feather wallcoverings, inspired by an art deco 1923 illustration of feathers by Raoul Dufy, can be found in Hyde Park-facing suite salons. Each panel has been lovingly made by local artist, Lizzie Deshayes from Fromental.

  • The hotel’s new carpets and rugs are inspired by Hyde Park textures from fallen foliage, cracked earth to glimmering reflections on the Serpentine.

  • With a nod of respect to the Royal Household Cavalry, who pass by the hotel on the way to the Changing of Guard at Buckingham Palace, horsehair has been used in many of the light sconces to offer a warm and unique textural effect.

  • Inspired by the park, many of the bedrooms showcase mirrored artwork made-up of panels of nickel, burnt silver and copper leafing that is etched by hand to reveal distinct designs of branch work and foliage.

  • Madrona Burl bleached wood veneer, finished in a light blond hue, has been used on all millwork and furniture. The treatment is new, whilst the material used is one steeped in tradition. Cork wallpaper can also be found, the texture of which resembles bark.

  • Each of the hotel’s Presidential Suites is named after a different unsung hero who has contributed to botanical preservation and research for Britain.

  • British fashion designer Jenny Packham created Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park, London’s new fan. Taking inspiration from the property’s ideal park side location, the fan incorporates layers of delicate organza appliquéd leaves that are scattered with sequin and crystal dew drops. The sticks of the fan are laser cut in the same pattern as the railings on the gates of nearby Apsley House, formerly known as Number 1 London, home to the Duke of Wellington.

  • The hotel has commissioned VISTO Images to compile an outstanding art portfolio throughout the hotel.  Each of the hotel’s new floor landings showcases a striking photograph by Mary McCartney, while the corridors are home to pieces inspired by the nature of Hyde Park and English technological innovations featured at the 1851 Great Exhibition.  Other eclectic art pieces can be found throughout the hotel’s public areas.

  • Sir Peter Blake, the ‘Godfather of British Pop Art’ was commissioned to create a college, the size of 38 double-decker buses, to cover Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park, London’s iconic façade during part of the hotel’s restoration. The immense collage of 100 prominent faces, entitled Our Fans, was the largest artwork Sir Peter Blake has ever created.

  • Each of the hotel’s suites is home to an Assai record player and a selection of 10 records for the guests to enjoy – these range from The Beatles Greatest Hits to Masterpieces of Antonio Vivaldi.

  • Heywood Hill, who have been selling books since 1936 and received a Royal Warrant from Her Majesty The Queen in 2011, have curated a bespoke library of books within each of the hotel’s suites.

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